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Sunbelt W2Knews™ Electronic Newsletter
The secret of those "who always seem to know" - Over 500,000 Readers!
Sun, Mar 28, 1999
NT Reliability Survey Results
  This issue of W2Knews™ contains:
1. EDITORS CORNER 
* SUNBELT SURVEY MAKES CNN

2. TECH BRIEFING
* 7 CHARACTER WINDOWS NT PASSWORDS MORE SECURE THAN 10?

3. NT RELATED NEWS 
* GET YOUR HANDS ON NT 4 AND Win2K FOR ONLY $125
* SURPRISING NT RELIABILITY SURVEY RESULTS
* NT BOOK OF THE MONTH
* NT 4.0 SERVICE PACK 5 BETA RELEASED
* WIN2000 MAY CAUSE BUSINESS SOFTWARE COMPATIBILITY PROBLEMS

4. NT THIRD PARTY NEWS
* 60% OF CRASHES CAN CAUSE DATA LOSS: HOW TO PREVENT DOWNTIME?
* SMARTBATCH32 SPECIAL INTRO OFFER

5. HINTS AND TIPS - TIME SAVERS AND OTHER GOODIES...

6. THE NT STOCK WATCH - Friday March 12, 1999

7. Y2K WATCH 

8. HOW TO USE THE MAILING LIST
Instructions on how to subscribe, sign off or change your address.

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****************WHAT IS NTOOLS E-NEWS?******************************
Sunbelt Windows NTools E-News is the World's first and largest 
E-Newsletter designed for NT System Managers that have the job to 
get and keep NT up & running in a production environment. Sunbelt 
launched this electronic newsletter early 1996. Every two weeks we
keep the Windows NT community informed and aware of new developments
of NT and 3-rd party NT System Management Tools. You get hints and
tips that will enable you to better utilize and understand Windows NT, 
now renamed to Windows 2000 (W2K and pronounced Win-two-K).

You'll find general Windows NT related and third party news, tech
information, and 3-rd party beta and release information. As a
subscriber to NTools E-News[tm], you will receive instant notifi-
cation of important NT related events and you are also a charter 
member of the Sunbelt Field Test Bonus Program. Sunbelt Software is 
the first and largest distributor worldwide of Third Party System
Management Tools for Windows NT with 6 subsidiaries in the US and 
Europe.
*******************************************************************


1. "EDITORS CORNER" 

Hi NT-ers,

The recent Sunbelt March99 Linux Survey made CNN. They reported on
it via their Technology Column written by industry veteran Nick
Petreley. He quotes testimony of Microsoft executive Paul Maritz 
in the DOJ vs. Microsoft case, where Paul describes the rapid 
ascent of Linux. Interesting reading. Nick is editorial director
of LinuxWorld Magazine and InfoWorld columnist. I have been reading
InfoWorld since 1981, great mag. A large chunk of our survey was 
quoted here: http://www.cnn.com/TECH/computing/9903/24/mslinux.html/

This time, we have an equally interesting survey about how often
NT crashes and why. Great data and when you have the results, this
is good ammo you can use to get several things you need. Keep on
reading, there is good stuff this time!

Warm regards,

Stu Sjouwerman

********************************************************************

2. "TECH BRIEFING"

* 7 CHARACTER WINDOWS NT PASSWORDS MORE SECURE THAN 10?
-contributed by Bill Wall, STAT Operations Center-

NT stores two types of passwords, a LAN Manager (LM) password (less 
secure) and a Windows NT password (more secure). A Windows NT server 
(domain controller) gives out an 8-byte challenge and the client 
(server or workstation) replies with a 24-byte challenge response. 
These hashes are transmitted in the clear. If the domain controller 
authenticates the challenge response, it replies with an NT session
key and a LAN Manager (LM) session key. These session keys are 
encrypted between the client and the Domain Controller. 

The LAN Manager password is compatible with passwords used by the 
LAN manager. It is based on the OEM character set, is not case 
sensitive, and can be up to 14 chars long. The NT password is 
based on the Unicode character set, is case sensitive, and can be 
up to 128 chars long. 

Each password is encrypted twice in two forms in the SAM database. 
The first encryption is a one-way function (OWF) version of the 
clear text password. This password is then encrypted by DES to make 
it even more obscure. The Windows NT Security Account Manager (SAM) 
database stores the hashed password for each user account into two 
forms. One form is an "NT hash" form that is used to authenticate 
users on Windows NT clients, and the other is an "LM hash" form that 
is used to authenticate users on Windows 95, Windows 98, DOS, 3.1, 
Windows for Workgroups, OS/2, and Macintosh. 

The Windows NT hash specification says you can have up to 128 char
passwords. However, you can only type in 14 chars into User Manager. 
If you try to put in more than 14 chars in the "Minimum Password 
Length" section of the Account Policy, you may not be able to log 
in again. There is a 16-byte LM hash and a 16-byte NT hash. You 
only have to go through 7 chars to retrieve passwords up to 14 
chars in length in the LM hash. There is no salting done. 

The first 8 bytes of the LM hash are derived from the first 7 chars
of the password. The second 8 bytes are derived from the 8th through 
14th chars. If the password is 7 chars or less, the 2nd half will 
always by a constant. 

This means that a password of 7 chars may be more secure than a 
password with 8, 9, or 10 chars. If a password has 10 chars, it is 
split up into a password hash of 7 chars and another password hash 
of 3 chars. The password hash of 3 chars can be easily cracked with 
password crackers such as l0phtcrack or Password Appraiser. For 
example, if the second half of the password (the last 3 chars of a 
10-character password) is cracked and ends in 789, then it is a 
safe assumption that the previous password chars may be 123456. 

For an 8-character password, you will always have password cracker 
programs find that 8th character when the LM password is used. The 7 
byte strings are then converted to an 8-byte odd parity DES key. 
DESkey1 is used to encrypt the 16-bit challenge key. DESkey2 is 
then used to encrypt the challenge key. And DESkey3 is used to 
encrypt the challenge key. The hash is encrypted with DES by using 
the computer?s Relative ID (RID) as the crypt key. This is the 
so-called "obfuscation" step. 

The three 8-byte values are then concatenated, and the 24-byte 
response is returned to the server. The server does the same thing 
to the hash on its end and compares the result to the 24-byte 
response. If they match, it was a correct original hash. The 
challenge response can be brute-forced for the LM-hash. 

The number of possible combinations in the LM password is relatively 
low compared to the Windows NT password. It is also easier to see if 
it's shorter than 8 chars or not. The user name and the corresponding 
one way hashes are stored in the password database, which is part of 
the SAM. The SAM database can also be duplicated in the \repair 
directory.

The LM password can be disabled through the registry by setting the 
LM compatibility level, so that only the more secure Windows NT 
password is used. However, Windows NT will not be able to communicate 
with Windows 95/98 or other machines other than Windows NT. If you are 
in an all-Windows NT environment, then setting the LM compatibility 
level is the right thing to do.

The Password Restrictions section of the Account Policy (Start | 
Programs | Administrative Tools | User Manager | Policies | Account) 
is where you set password policies. The Minimum Password Length 
section is set to "Permit Blank Password" when Windows NT is first 
installed. This should never be used in a secure environment. 

This option should be set to at least 7 chars. The most secure 
setting would be 14 chars, but this number may be hard to remember 
and users would start writing down their passwords and making it 
visible near their computer. 

Another good account policy is to enable account lockout. No lockout 
to failed login attempts makes the Windows NT host vulnerable to 
password guessing. Set the lockout to lockout after 3 bad logon 
attempts, reset after 30 minutes, and set the lockout duration to 
"Forever (until admin unlocks)."

Another thing to watch out for is automatic logon. Automatic logon 
could undermine security since any attacker could access your computer
with the default password stored in the registry. Automatic logon 
should be disabled and passwords should not be stored in plain text 
anywhere on your computer.

STAT-NT by Harris performs many password vulnerability checks. It 
includes a fast password checker, which looks for common dictionary
words and user names used as passwords. It checks your account policy 
and examines the password restrictions. It checks for all relevant 
registry settings dealing with better password security and Auto- 
Fixes these vulnerabilities when selected by a user with administrative 
privileges. More info: http://www.sunbelt-software.com/stat.htm

********************************************************************


3. "NT RELATED NEWS" 

* GET YOUR HANDS ON NT 4 AND WIN 2000 FOR ONLY $125

You may have missed this news, but MS released something they call 
the 'HOT Kit': It is a Hands-On Training Tool for Microsoft Windows 
NT. You can order Not-For-Resale (NFR) versions of NT Server 4.0 with 
Service Pack 4, NT 4.0 Option Pack, Services for NetWare and a voucher 
to receive a free NFR copy of Windows 2000 Server (upon release date).
They are all jam-packed into the Hands-on-Training (HOT) Training Kit. 
You can evaluate the product, get trained, and for professionals, 
learn how to sell it. It only costs $125 bucks and I ordered one today.

Some things to watch for though, they outsourced it to some outfit
and the order form is a bit clunky. Put no spaces in your credit card
number and only use 06/01 for month/year data. They only accept Visa
and Master and no AMEX. Offer is only good for USA, but you might want
to get in touch with your local MS office. if you need to make changes
in your orderform, do NOT click on the BACK key but use the button on
the form. Took me three times filling it out completely, but hey this
is a good deal. This is the URL where you can order:
http://www.microsoft.com/directaccess/rdr/0324/hotkit.htm
---------------------------------

* SURPRISING NT RELIABILITY SURVEY RESULTS

In cooperation with the Giga Group, Sunbelt Software recently completed 
a large survey of NT system administrators regarding NT reliability. 
The results, particularly when compared to Giga's previous smaller 
samples, are surprising. In general, the NT systems managed by this 
sample of respondents are far more reliable than previously reported 
results. Giga's VP and Senior Analyst Richard Fichera reports:

NT MUCH MORE RELIABLE THAN PREVIOUSLY BELIEVED

Overall reliability - NT is more stable than we had previously believed.
Although we still believe it to be less reliable than UNIX, it is better
than our last survey from our Emerging Technology Conference, in which
almost half a sample of nearly 100 managers indicated they though their
servers crashed at least once per month. In this survey, with 1339
respondents covering over 50,000 servers, only about 12% experienced hard
BSOD (Blue Screen of Death) crashes at intervals of once per month or 
more frequently. 

We also collected data on application related crashes, which although 
they are not additive to the BSOD crashes, occurred once per month in 
about 20% of the servers, giving us a bounded range of between 12 and 32
percent of the servers experiencing halts of some kind once a month ? much
less than our initial assumptions. What was particularly significant was
the large number of servers that ran for more than 6 months without a 
BSOD crash (61%) or an application crash (47%). 

This number surprised us even more than the low number of systems with 
frequent problems. The pattern here of a wide variance in results leads 
us to place credence in other data which suggests that operational 
practices, as cited in an earlier Giga publication: 'Best Practices for
NT Management'.

CAUSES OF BSOD CRASHES:

Causes of BSOD crashes - Eliminating the almost 20% of crashes where 
the cause was unknown, hardware was cited as the cause in 20%. We think 
that the hardware number is actually lower, since the majority of unknown
failures are probably software, because most hardware failures are not
intermittent, and do not allow a restart, and are readily identifiable as
such. 

Of the software failures, kernel mode drivers were cited as the most 
frequent offender, causing more problems than the NT kernel itself. 
Third party kernel mode drivers seemed to cause slightly more problems 
than Microsoft-supplied drivers, but they are closer than one would 
expect, given the presumed expertise of Microsoft developers with their 
own environment. Incorrect configuration (wrong driver, security config, 
missing files) was a significant contributor. Anti-virus software was 
cited as causing a surprising 6% of the BSOD crashes.

Problem applications - In a list of applications which caused problems, 
the most frequent mentions were anti-virus software, IIS, and Exchange. 
We have a list of approximately 1000 citations for software, and will 
perform further analysis on the data as time allows.

Data loss and crash recovery - One surprising result of the survey was 
the incidence of data loss or corruption of disk data upon crashes, with 
only 39% reporting that they never experienced any data loss, 56% 
reporting ?occasional? losses, and 4% reporting loss half the time or 
more often. Apparently most installations have good backup and recovery
procedures, since half of the respondents indicated that it took an hour 
or less to recover, and almost 90% of sites were recovered in less than 
4 Hrs.

Our summary impression is that NT is more reliable than we had thought, 
but its wide variance and still significant tail of problem systems 
(those with more than one crash per month) and reports of data loss 
mean that its use for enterprise critical applications must still be 
carefully weighed against the potential risks. On the other hand, the
preponderance of largely trouble-free systems in the survey clearly 
indicates that you can deploy reliable NT systems. Unfortunately the 
limitations of our survey instrument did not allow us to correlate 
applications, management practices, and reliability. We have hopes to 
perform some of this research in follow-ups to this survey.

For the Raw Data on NT BSOD crashes, check this URL: 
http://www.sunbelt-software.com/ntrelres3.htm
------------------------------

* NT BOOK OF THE MONTH

For April 1999, it's "Windows NT Domain Architecture. The book gives
expert insight into designing and implementing NT domains. Especially 
with W2K around the corner, you need to know how to set up domains the 
right way. The book has detailed examples of domain configuration, 
and really useful info about DHCP, WINS and DNS. Gregg Branham has 
done an excellent job. If you want to know more, go here:
http://www.mcp.com/catalog/ and in the search box
enter the following words: windows nt domain architecture
That will give you more info. Price is 39.95 and ISBN 1578701120 
Warmly Recommended!
------------------------------

* NT 4.0 SERVICE PACK 5 BETA RELEASED

A beta for Service Pack 5 for Windows NT Server 4.0 & Windows
NT Workstation 4.0 was released a few days ago to approximately
500 beta testers. This SP5 is not a must-upgrade. If you are
currently deploying SP4 you do not need to alter your deployment 
plans. When the final version of SP5 is available, I suggest 
you investigate the issues that are fixed, as Microsoft will fully
document them on the web. You can then determine whether it is 
appropriate to deploy SP5.

Additional Data:
* Service Pack 5 will be available for Windows NT Server 4.0, 
Windows NT Server 4.0 Enterprise Edition, and Windows NT WS 4.0
* SP5 will be available via CD or via web download 
* SP5 will contain both Alpha and Intel versions on the 1 CD.
* The Web download is planning two installation options: the
auto-install and the full installation. The Auto-installation 
performs an auto-detect and installs only the fixes relevant 
to your system configuration. The larger, full installation, 
installs all SP5 bits as well as additional features from 
previous Service Packs.
* SP5 is cumulative and contains all fixes and features from SP4.
* Retail boxes of Windows NT Server 4.0 and Windows NT
Workstation 4.0 will not include Service Pack 5.
* Further information will be available via Infoweb and
future field mail updates.
------------------------------

* WIN2000 MAY CAUSE BUSINESS SOFTWARE COMPATIBILITY PROBLEMS

Microsoft is getting ready to roll out the third and final beta of 
W2K next month. Some potential difficulties with deployment are now
coming out of the woodwork. Last week, some officials from MS confirmed 
the system may not be fully compatible with some business apps. The 
problem is caused by the many different development practices that 
third-party programmers have used in writing applications in the past.

"We're being much more disciplined about what we allow applications 
to write or not write-and in doing that, we will be breaking compati-
bility with a lot of applications," says Yusuf Mehdi, director of 
marketing in Microsoft's applications and Internet client group.

Obviously this problem exists mainly with the desktop flavor 'Windows 
2000 Professional'. Yusuf Mehdi continued with: "We've said we're 
going to maximize reliability and then, as much as possible, get 
compatibility". He followed up with admitting that this strategy 
could require administrators to revise or reinstall applications.
He claimed though that it's "the right decision to make." 

If you are planning to replace all your desktops with W2K, you may
need to plan a trip to each one of them if some apps need to be
reinstalled. Just a thing to keep in mind!
------------------------------


********************************************************************
4. NT THIRD PARTY NEWS

* 60% OF CRASHES CAN CAUSE DATA LOSS: HOW TO PREVENT DOWNTIME?

Last week, 5,000 NT System Administrators were sent a survey
about NT reliability. A tremendous percentage of 27% answered the
survey. Out of these, 54% reported that crashes occasionally
caused data loss, and 4% reported this half of the time or more.

So now you have some real data about how important it is to protect
your data. This is ammo you can use to get approval for a tool 
like the new Double-Take Version 3.0 that will help you to prevent
downtime.

Having a crash is bad enough already, and 50% is able to recover
within an hour, with another 35% within 4 hours. Suffering from
a crash is bad enough, but losing data is even worse and will make
your system recovery even longer. Downtime costs per hour are
significant when dozens or hundreds of users are sitting on their
hands. It amounts to many thousands of dollars and usually your
management can calculate within a few minutes how expensive it is.

For any mission critical NT Server we strongly recommend to have
a mirroring and fail-over solution like Double-Take in place. This
creates a configuration that has NO SINGLE POINT OF FAILURE. Data
on Source Server A get mirrored in real-time to Target Server B.
if Server A crashes, Server B kicks in, renames itself to A and 
presents the data to the users. These may not even notice that
the Server A died!. You prevented downtime, and you're the hero
of the day. You need 'Windows NT Magazine's Editor's Choice': 
Double-Take V3.0 http://www.sunbelt-software.com/dtake.htm

Just an example, if you need global distribution and fault tole-
rance of intra- or internet websites, this is the way to go.
There are a few types of tools you cannot afford to live without.
Double-Take is one of these. It costs only $1,495 per server. This 
is a no-brainer. Don't wait. Do it now. It will save your butt.
------------------------------


* SMARTBATCH32 SPECIAL INTRO OFFER

The developer of SmartBatch32 has come up with a 90-day special:
SmartBatch32 turns batch processing on Windows NT into a _reality_.
Struggling with batch scripts and the AT scheduler? Ever wondered
what?s happening to your batch jobs? Wasting time and money? Be
sure not to miss the limited-time special offer on SmartBatch32, 
our premier batch job scheduler for Windows NT.

With the new V3.2 release and the introduction of a Web
Administrator, Sunbelt customers are being given a limited-time
special offer. With the purchase of one SmartBatch32 Enterprise
Edition license, customers will also receive one Remote Agent and
three Web Administrators, at no additional charge.

This gives you batch job scheduling capabilities on two NT systems
and monitoring capabilities for three administrators?all for only
$995.00!

Key Features and Benefits:
* Enterprise-level scheduling with central management
* Integrated notification by paging, e-mail, or Messenger Service
* Monitoring and execution anywhere via a web interface
* Error detection and recovery
* Complete and flexible scheduling options with exception dates
* File and event dependencies
* Sequencing
* Logging
* Easy-to-use

For more info: http://www.sunbelt-software.com/smart32.htm 
(also the place to get your free 30-day trial version).
--------------------------------

********************************************************************

5. "HINTS AND TIPS - TIME SAVERS AND OTHER GOODIES...

Mario Stelzner sent the following:

" Hi there, regarding your 10 points 'How to prepare for W2K' you 
mention in point 5 'Read an X.500 book'. For people that are really 
interested in the topic, here is a URL for an on-line version of a 
X.500 book that's not available any longer in the stores. 
http://www.salford.ac.uk/its024/X500.htm
Just in case somebody asks. :-) " 

I went over and had a look. Good resource. Thanks Mario!

********************************************************************

6. "THE NT STOCK WATCH" Closing day Friday March 26, 1999

52 WK 52 WK P/E WEEK
SECURITY CLOSE HIGH LOW RATIO CHNG
---------------------------------------------------------------------
Advanced Micro Devices... 16 33 12 3/4 -0.3%
BMC Softwear............. 37 11/16 60 1/4 30 1/8 28 +10.8%
Citrix Systems Inc....... 40 1/8 53 3/4 23 1/8 60 +3.2%
Compaq Computer.......... 31 1/4 51 1/4 22 15/16 +1.6%
Computer Associates...... 33 15/16 61 15/16 26 34 -0.1%
Data General Corp........ 12 1/4 21 13/16 7 +24.8%
Dell Computer............ 37 7/8 55 15 3/8 72 -5.9%
Gateway 2000 Inc......... 65 5/8 84 1/2 36 1/8 30 -4.1%
Hewlett Packard Co....... 68 11/16 83 7/8 47 1/16 24 -2.8%
Intergraph Corp.......... 6 1/2 10 9/16 4 11/16 -1.8%
International Business Ma 172 3/8 199 1/4 101 3/8 26 +2.2%
Micron Electronics Inc... 11 5/16 24 3/4 9 11/16 29 -7.1%
Microsoft Corp........... 178 1/8 180 1/16 81 1/16 76 +4.0%
NCR Corp................. 46 1/2 55 3/4 23 1/2 39 -4.1%
Network Associates Inc... 31 1/16 67 11/16 25 1/2 +10.6%
Novell Inc............... 25 3/8 28 1/8 9 3/16 77 -3.1%
Oracle Corp.............. 27 1/2 41 1/8 12 1/8 35 -0.2%
Qualcomm Incorporated.... 111 9/16 98 9/16 37 3/4 69 +31.9%
Qualix Group Inc......... 6 11/16 9 1/8 0 15/16 -7.7%
Seagate Technology....... 27 1/2 44 1/4 16 1/8 -10.2%
Silicon Graphics......... 14 9/16 20 7/8 7 3/8 +5.4%
Sun Microsystems Inc..... 116 1/2 118 15/16 38 3/16 53 +5.5%
Sybase Inc............... 6 15/32 11 5/8 4 1/2 +2.4%
Symantec Corp............ 15 13/16 32 5/8 8 11/16 21 +1.6%
Unisys Corp.............. 28 3/4 36 1/2 17 1/4 27 -8.5%
Veritas Software Corp.... 77 1/4 89 1/2 23 3/4 77 -11.5%
Dow Jones 30 Industrials. 9,822.24 -0.8%




********************************************************************
7. "Y2K WATCH" Only 279 days to Jan 1, 2000 

I found an interesting article on the Y2KNet News Update. This is
the summary and link to the whole article is below.

"Why I Don't Believe the Y2K Problem Will Be Fixed On Time"
by Mark R. Hettler

The magnitude of the task of fixing every instance of the Y2K 
computer problem, coupled with the limited time remaining to 
fix it, has led many observers to predict serious disruptions 
and shortages in areas basic to our day to day life: electrical 
power, fuel supply, food supply, transportation, communications, 
health care, banking, and many other areas. In recent weeks, 
however, those who claim that the Y2K problem will cause minimal 
or no disruptions have cited surveys of large numbers of businesses, 
government agencies, and other organizations, in which virtually 
all the organizations surveyed claim they will have the problem 
fixed by the end of 1999.

I don't believe them. Find out why at:
http://www.y2knet.com/y2k/situation/articles/9903/believe.html

Stu's take: Whether these somewhat troublesome predictions are 
true or not, I think it's a good idea to be personally prepared 
anyway. Have some food, water and other emergency items stocked 
up if you are in an area that is vulnerable. If you are an NT
expert living in the middle of China, I'd say don't bother .

********************************************************************
8. "HOW TO USE THE MAILING LIST"
Instructions on how to subscribe, sign off
or change your email address


TO SUBSCRIBE TO THE LIST (Tell your friends!)

Click: http://lyris.sunbelt-software.com/scripts/lyris.pl?join=nt-list
and fill out the form, simple & easy: 1 minute work.

Or by email, send a blank message to the following address:
[email protected]

_____________________________________________________

TO QUIT THE LIST

1) The Web Way:
http://lyris.sunbelt-software.com/scripts/lyris.pl?
choose the NT-List, use your email address that is at 
the bottom of each newsletter and leave the list via 
the web interface.

2) The Email Way: Simply follow the personalized 
instructions at the very end of this newsletter.
_____________________________________________________

TO CHANGE YOUR ADDRESS

First unsubscribe and then resubscribe as per the
procedure above.

********************************************************************

FOR MORE INFORMATION

On the World Wide Web point your browser to:

For the newsletter and our website:
USA: http://www.sunbelt-software.com

Email for US sales information to:
[email protected]
Email for US Tech support to:
[email protected]
Email to the US Editor:
[email protected]

Email for European Sales to:
[email protected]
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At the time of this newsletter's release, all links were checked 
to verify their accuracy and validity. However, due to the ever-
changing pages of various sites, some links may later prove to be 
invalid. We regret any inconvenience should you be unable to open 
any of these links.
********************************************************************

Things Our Lawyers Make Us Say:
This document is provided for informational purposes only. 
The information contained in this document represents the
current view of Sunbelt Software Distribution on the issues
discussed as of the date of publication. Because Sunbelt
must respond to changes in market conditions, it should not
be interpreted to be a commitment on the part of Sunbelt
and Sunbelt cannot guarantee the accuracy of any informa-
tion presented after the date of publication.

INFORMATION PROVIDED IN THIS DOCUMENT IS PROVIDED "AS IS"
WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EITHER EXPRESS OR IMPLIED,
INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF
MERCHANTABILITY, FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE AND
FREEDOM FROM INFRINGEMENT.

The user assumes the entire risk as to the accuracy and the
use of this document. This document may be copied and
distributed subject to the following conditions: 1) All text
must be copied without modification and all pages must be
included; 2) All copies must contain Sunbelt's copyright
notice and any other notices provided therein; and 3) This
document may not be distributed for profit. All trademarks
acknowledged. Copyright Sunbelt Software Distribution, Inc.
1996-1999.

(email me with feedback: [email protected])